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The threat of cancer reaches homes: dangerous greenhouse products due to chemicals

The threat of cancer reaches homes: dangerous greenhouse products due to chemicals

Peregraf- Haval Zangana

In Kurdistan Region, greenhouse products pose a silent threat to the lives of people and are sources of life-threatening diseases due to the fact that standard chemicals are not being used and there is a lack of proper monitoring. Some of the chemicals require several days and it is imperative to adequately wash the product for their adverse effects to go away; an investigation by Peregraf reveals.

Sheikh Jamal Krpchna, an exceptional peasant who has come up with some agricultural inventions, told Peregraf: "Some farmers do not follow the regulations and their products harm people."

Two types of chemicals are used in a greenhouse; the first type is dissolved in water and used through irrigation.

"For this type, the instruction for use on the chemicals indicates that the effect will remain after 3 to 7 or 14 to 21 days. So, if the product is still growing, the chemical should be used after the harvest" said Krpchna

Some farmers use this type of chemical while the product is about to get ripe, and they harvest the products and send them to the market right afterwards, while the effect of the chemicals are still active and can harm consumers.

The second type of chemical is used on the surface of the products and it is possible to send them to the market before the effect goes away. As sheikh Jamal says, the product should then be washed properly.

He claimed that the chemicals with three days' effect duration are expensive; 35 grams for 38 USD. Therefore, the farmers are avoiding it. "That is because the companies importing the chemicals are indifferent."

The chemicals are used for different purposes and consist mostly of pesticides and fertilizers. Pesticides are the most dangerous.

Sarbaz Faqe Jafar, an agricultural engineer, told Peregraf: "The danger arises when the product is harvested while the effect of the chemical is still active."

Chemicals produced by countries such as Germany, Switzerland and America are reliable but chemicals produced by Turkey or China "are more harmful".

"Some products are more perishable, so they need to be used sooner. Some become carcinogenic and should not be used at all. Others should be used seven days before the harvest but some farmers do not harvest the product before, which is perilous."

Sarbaz Faqe also added that their job is to give instructions to the farmers, but it all depends on the extent to which the farmers are following the instructions. Most of the chemicals used on plants are harmful to humans as they cause cancer and other diseases.

Professor Sdiq Adl Sdiq, the head of the Horticulture Department at University of Sulaymaniyah, School of Agricultural Sciences, told Peregraf: "These chemicals, pesticides and fertilizers, were used after the green revolution. They are internationally allowed according to law, but in under-developed countries they are not used according to the standards."

"When these chemicals stay in the body, they affect the liver and kidney and can be a source of cancer."

 The professor recommends that people wash fruits and vegetables in salt water for ten minutes as some chemicals are used on the surface and can be removed only be proper washing.

He also mentioned that most of the companies importing plant chemicals are not reliable. "They do not even put instructions for use on the chemical packets. The chemicals should be tested so that we know which company is reliable. Experts should supervise the case."

In Kurdistan Region, there are 19000 greenhouses owned by 3000 farmers, most of them are located in Sulaymaniyah.

Kamal Muhammad Rasul, the director of greenhouses in the KRG’s Ministry of Agriculture, stated that in Kurdistan Region there are 19718 greenhouses; 528 in Erbil, 12511 in Sulaymaniyah, 612 in Duhok, 348 in Halabja, 712 in Garmian.

He also told Peregraf: "We have supervisors in the Ministry of Agriculture who are supervising the projects, but due to the financial crisis, the monitoring process is not as effective as before. We gave instructions in the past that any chemical with an effect which lasts for more than three days should not be used."

Kamal Muhammad mentioned a case when they found products with high protein levels imported from a neighboring country. When they investigated, they were told that Iraq should do tests for the products and do not allow bad products to enter.

"The products imported from neighboring countries are very dangerous, labs should be built in critical locations so the products are tested before they reach the markets." Kemal insisted.

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The threat of cancer reaches homes: dangerous greenhouse products due to chemicals

2019-07-23 15:38:09

Peregraf- Haval Zangana

In Kurdistan Region, greenhouse products pose a silent threat to the lives of people and are sources of life-threatening diseases due to the fact that standard chemicals are not being used and there is a lack of proper monitoring. Some of the chemicals require several days and it is imperative to adequately wash the product for their adverse effects to go away; an investigation by Peregraf reveals.

Sheikh Jamal Krpchna, an exceptional peasant who has come up with some agricultural inventions, told Peregraf: "Some farmers do not follow the regulations and their products harm people."

Two types of chemicals are used in a greenhouse; the first type is dissolved in water and used through irrigation.

"For this type, the instruction for use on the chemicals indicates that the effect will remain after 3 to 7 or 14 to 21 days. So, if the product is still growing, the chemical should be used after the harvest" said Krpchna

Some farmers use this type of chemical while the product is about to get ripe, and they harvest the products and send them to the market right afterwards, while the effect of the chemicals are still active and can harm consumers.

The second type of chemical is used on the surface of the products and it is possible to send them to the market before the effect goes away. As sheikh Jamal says, the product should then be washed properly.

He claimed that the chemicals with three days' effect duration are expensive; 35 grams for 38 USD. Therefore, the farmers are avoiding it. "That is because the companies importing the chemicals are indifferent."

The chemicals are used for different purposes and consist mostly of pesticides and fertilizers. Pesticides are the most dangerous.

Sarbaz Faqe Jafar, an agricultural engineer, told Peregraf: "The danger arises when the product is harvested while the effect of the chemical is still active."

Chemicals produced by countries such as Germany, Switzerland and America are reliable but chemicals produced by Turkey or China "are more harmful".

"Some products are more perishable, so they need to be used sooner. Some become carcinogenic and should not be used at all. Others should be used seven days before the harvest but some farmers do not harvest the product before, which is perilous."

Sarbaz Faqe also added that their job is to give instructions to the farmers, but it all depends on the extent to which the farmers are following the instructions. Most of the chemicals used on plants are harmful to humans as they cause cancer and other diseases.

Professor Sdiq Adl Sdiq, the head of the Horticulture Department at University of Sulaymaniyah, School of Agricultural Sciences, told Peregraf: "These chemicals, pesticides and fertilizers, were used after the green revolution. They are internationally allowed according to law, but in under-developed countries they are not used according to the standards."

"When these chemicals stay in the body, they affect the liver and kidney and can be a source of cancer."

 The professor recommends that people wash fruits and vegetables in salt water for ten minutes as some chemicals are used on the surface and can be removed only be proper washing.

He also mentioned that most of the companies importing plant chemicals are not reliable. "They do not even put instructions for use on the chemical packets. The chemicals should be tested so that we know which company is reliable. Experts should supervise the case."

In Kurdistan Region, there are 19000 greenhouses owned by 3000 farmers, most of them are located in Sulaymaniyah.

Kamal Muhammad Rasul, the director of greenhouses in the KRG’s Ministry of Agriculture, stated that in Kurdistan Region there are 19718 greenhouses; 528 in Erbil, 12511 in Sulaymaniyah, 612 in Duhok, 348 in Halabja, 712 in Garmian.

He also told Peregraf: "We have supervisors in the Ministry of Agriculture who are supervising the projects, but due to the financial crisis, the monitoring process is not as effective as before. We gave instructions in the past that any chemical with an effect which lasts for more than three days should not be used."

Kamal Muhammad mentioned a case when they found products with high protein levels imported from a neighboring country. When they investigated, they were told that Iraq should do tests for the products and do not allow bad products to enter.

"The products imported from neighboring countries are very dangerous, labs should be built in critical locations so the products are tested before they reach the markets." Kemal insisted.