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Knitting for 20 years without her eyes

Knitting for 20 years without her eyes
Khabir's dream is simple: to have a place in the city for blind people

 

 Peregraf - Duhok

 

Khabir Muhammad was born blind - ever since, her hands have been her guide to brighten her life. She is now 38 years old and has been working since the age of 18.

 

Khabir is from Duhok, "When I started knitting, people and friends were saying it would not be possible for me," she told Peregraf.

 

She uses some simple equipment at her disposal: a knitting hook, wool and a pair of scissors, without any up-to-date technology being used in the process.

 

"I buy the equipment to design clothes and later sell the clothes at the market." She added, "I've been doing this job for 20 years. I can manage my life with it."

 

She has three blind siblings, all born blind, one sister and two brothers. Her father is deceased, and she lives with her mother and sister.

 

She provides for her family, everyday knitting for hours, especially since a financial crisis hit the region a few years ago.

 

She said, "If there is demand for clothes, I will spend six-seven hours working that day."

 

Her clients range from one-time clients who ask for children's clothes, to those who visit regularly. She also independently manufactures some traditional costumes, as some people might have a preference for these.

 

Government institutions have not supported her at all, she claims, "Life becomes harder for us due to the financial crisis."

 

She has a low wage, like many other people with disabilities. The benefit has been reviewed due to the new instructions from the government, including several medical tests and regulations, which irritate the targeted people.

 

Khabir recalls this experience, "Due to the financial crisis and strange government instructions, we have to be always doing paperwork, which has affected us negatively."

 

The Union of Blind People in the Kurdistan Region has recorded six thousand people, either completely blind or suffering from weak eyesight. Some of them have shown their extraordinary abilities.

 

Khabir was able to additionally use her talent for coaching other people into knitting. She has managed to tutor three courses of knitting for blind people, to enable them to be independent, "I have taken part in my courses, with excellence. I also took part in 15 exhibitions."

 

Her dream is for a simple life, and a special place in her city, Duhok, for blind people, which includes 800 with low vision. She believes she can help them to accomplish a better life.

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Knitting for 20 years without her eyes

2018-12-28 13:12:36

 

 Peregraf - Duhok

 

Khabir Muhammad was born blind - ever since, her hands have been her guide to brighten her life. She is now 38 years old and has been working since the age of 18.

 

Khabir is from Duhok, "When I started knitting, people and friends were saying it would not be possible for me," she told Peregraf.

 

She uses some simple equipment at her disposal: a knitting hook, wool and a pair of scissors, without any up-to-date technology being used in the process.

 

"I buy the equipment to design clothes and later sell the clothes at the market." She added, "I've been doing this job for 20 years. I can manage my life with it."

 

She has three blind siblings, all born blind, one sister and two brothers. Her father is deceased, and she lives with her mother and sister.

 

She provides for her family, everyday knitting for hours, especially since a financial crisis hit the region a few years ago.

 

She said, "If there is demand for clothes, I will spend six-seven hours working that day."

 

Her clients range from one-time clients who ask for children's clothes, to those who visit regularly. She also independently manufactures some traditional costumes, as some people might have a preference for these.

 

Government institutions have not supported her at all, she claims, "Life becomes harder for us due to the financial crisis."

 

She has a low wage, like many other people with disabilities. The benefit has been reviewed due to the new instructions from the government, including several medical tests and regulations, which irritate the targeted people.

 

Khabir recalls this experience, "Due to the financial crisis and strange government instructions, we have to be always doing paperwork, which has affected us negatively."

 

The Union of Blind People in the Kurdistan Region has recorded six thousand people, either completely blind or suffering from weak eyesight. Some of them have shown their extraordinary abilities.

 

Khabir was able to additionally use her talent for coaching other people into knitting. She has managed to tutor three courses of knitting for blind people, to enable them to be independent, "I have taken part in my courses, with excellence. I also took part in 15 exhibitions."

 

Her dream is for a simple life, and a special place in her city, Duhok, for blind people, which includes 800 with low vision. She believes she can help them to accomplish a better life.